The Assistees Blog

Stories on Being Allies to the Neurodiverse | Assistees - Tees That Assist. Blog posts about disabilities. Ranging from autism/neurodiversity, blindness, visually-impairment, deafness, hard of hearing, and more.

Stories of Allies

The next time you're in a public area, look around. Find someone who may be struggling with the lights, sounds, or interactions. And if you can, lend a helping hand. Here are some real-life examples of people helping the Neurodiverse community: Stephen WiltshireAs a child, Stephen Wiltshire couldn’t speak. Although, he sketched stunningly accurate images of wildlife and caricatures of his teachers. His older sister took him to different places in London so he could sketch different buildings. One day, she took him on the 14th floor of an apartment building, so he could see a sprawling view of the city. He marveled at the layout...

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Why We Need Shirts for the Blind | Assistees - Tees That Assist. Blog posts about disabilities. Ranging from autism/neurodiversity, blindness, visually-impairment, deafness, hard of hearing, and more.

Why We Need Blindness Awareness Month

It's Blindness Awareness Month. This time is dedicated to the estimated 2.2 billion people who suffer from some form of visual impairment around the world. One billion of these cases could have been prevented or is yet to be addressed. So, we should all understand how to maintain optimal eye health and how to navigate life with visual impairments, whether for ourselves or loved ones. “Why do you make t-shirts for blind people? If they can’t see designs, what’s the point in crafting one for them?“ These are the questions that we are constantly asked. People don’t see the importance...

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A Guide on Listening

A Guide on Listening

I stutter, so I struggle with people always interrupting me. At at early age, I promised myself to always be an active listener so I won’t interrupt others. Although, this week has taught me that being an active listener doesn’t always require verbal conversations - it could be in the form of internet discussions. To be an active listener means to be receptive and engaging for the solution. When you’ve done something wrong, listen to the comments, reflect, and work on fixing the problem. Here are some tips to listen: Notice When You’re Interrupting: It’s okay to make a mistake...

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Guest Post: How to Spread Autism Awareness

Guest Post: How to Spread Autism Awareness

In the last few decades, the world has advocated for the promotion of awareness towards Autism. Neurodiversity is quickly becoming more common throughout the global population. In the 1990s, 1 in every 150 children were diagnosed as Autistic. Today, one in every 78 children is Autistic. The prognosis for children with autism vary from child to child. For many, they will need lifelong assistance and therapy to achieve basic milestones and functions. Others, who may be high functioning, may flourish throughout life with early intervention and an effective and strong support system. Some common therapy done with autism students include occupational therapy, speech...

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Tips for Effective Communication | Assistees - Tees That Assist. Blog posts about disabilities. Ranging from autism/neurodiversity, blindness, visually-impairment, deafness, hard of hearing, and more.

Tips for Effective Communication

I recently spoke with a young man who confided how people always interrupt him while he speaks. They think they’re actually helping the conversation flow rather than just wait for him to finish his thought. Although, it’s very important to realize there is no help in cutting someone off. A person’s words are sacred and should be treated as such. I researched and compiled a list of tips for effective communication: Use a Normal Tone of Voice Sometimes, people may (unknowingly) use a condescending tone while speaking to a disabled person. They may speak in a higher register to ensure...

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Resources for the Workforce | Assistees - Tees That Assist. Blog posts about disabilities. Ranging from autism/neurodiversity, blindness, visually-impairment, deafness, hard of hearing, and more.

Resources for the Workforce

As the pandemic slows down and businesses begin to reopen, the economy returns with an abundance of job openings. Although, there’s a large community of employers that discriminate against disabled people. The problem is most companies are strongly averse to hiring those who are considered “different.” Society has an unrealistic perception of “disabilities.” Most think autistic people are incapable of completing the duties of a job, contributing to a project, or even solving quotidian problems. In reality, people with neurological differences have unique brain processes and respond to information in a more efficient manner. Which means when everyone else in...

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